Third day of protests over rising fuel prices and government corruption #corruption #theresistance



(11 Jan 2012)
1. Mid of burning tire in street in the Ogba area of Lagos
2. Close of protester carrying log of wood
3. Wide of burnt out bus
4. Mid of protesters
5. Mid of protesters riding on a car and shouting “Ole,” meaning thief in the local Yoruba language
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Ademola Yakini, protester:
“The Government has failed us automatically, and we are going to fight for our rights, from the beginning to the end. Let the subsidies belong to them and let the fuel belong to us. The boys are now in action to stand for 48 hours everyday until when we achieve our goals. Go and tell Jonathan that he should leave that post, that he is not capable of holding Nigerian problem. From now onward, we are going to bring man of our own choice.”
7. Wide of angry protesters with burning tire in background; pan to crowd
8. Close of placard held by protester in Lekki, Lagos, reading (English) “We are ready for the civil war if the fuel cannot come down to ten Naira.”
9. Mid of protesters in Lekki
10. Close of car with smashed windows driving through protesters
STORYLINE
Nigeria’s government is warning that a paralysing national strike risks anarchy in the oil-rich nation, as demonstrations over spiralling fuel prices and government corruption entered their third day Wednesday.
In Lagos, Nigeria’s commercial capital of 15 million, several hundred protesters took over a major highway leading to the islands where the wealthy live. One protester carried a signed that read: “We are ready for the civil war.”
“The Government has failed us automatically, and we are going to fight for our rights, from the beginning to the end. Let the subsidies belong to them and let the fuel belong to us,” said protester Ademola Yakini.
The national strike, which began on Monday came after the decision by President Goodluck Jonathan’s administration to remove subsidies that keep gasoline prices low.
Overnight, prices at the pump rose from 1.70 US dollars per gallon (45 cents per litre) to at least 3.50 US dollars per gallon (94 cents per litre).
The costs of food and transportation also doubled in a nation where most live on less than two US dollars a day.
Jonathan insists that removing the subsidy was the right idea for Nigeria, saving the country an estimated 8 (b) billion US dollars a year that he promises will go toward badly needed road and public projects.
However, protesters who have joined the strike under the slogan of “Occupy Nigeria” say the time has come to end government corruption in a nation where military rulers and politicians have stolen billions.

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